Arizona Bug Company
Pest Control in Sedona and the Verde Valley, Prescott and Prescott Valley



1146 S 10th St, Cottonwood, Arizona 86326

928 649-5775 - Sedona and the Verde Valley

928 778-0005 - Prescott and Prescott Valley

Cool Bugs

10
Oct
Walkingstick Bug

Walkingstick Insect Looks Just Like a...Stick!

The Walkingstick is a slow-moving, plant-eating insect that spends most of its days hiding in the very plant that it eats. If disturbed this insect will sometimes play possum staying motionless until trouble passes. They develop by gradual metamorphosis meaning they go from egg to nymph to adult. The nymph generally looks like a smaller version of the adult and feeds on the same food source. The head on this insect is generally longer than it is wide. They start to show up in the Verde Valley mid to late summer.


Category : Bugs | Cool Bugs | Blog
4
Oct
Cicada Exoskeleton Shed

Cicada Exoskeleton Shed

Everyone hears the cicada buzzing in the trees this time of year. They’re especially noisy in the trees around Courthouse Square in Prescott. What some people don’t know is that this insect starts its life underground feeding on the roots of trees. When the conditions are right, they will crawl out of the ground and shed their exoskeleton – kind of like a butterfly emerging from its cocoon. The only difference is cicadas are dead ugly and make a lot of noise in the trees. Here is a picture of what is left after they shed their skin. You will often find these exoskeletons attached to sides of building and trees.

Category : Bugs | Cool Bugs | Blog
30
Sep
Green Tree Cricket or Thermometer Cricket

Green Tree Cricket or Thermometer Cricket

I don’t see these little summertime green Tree Crickets very often. They spend most of their time on plants feeding on insects. It’s been said that if you count the number of chirps you hear from this cricket at night in thirteen seconds, then add forty to it, you will get a pretty close estimate of the temperature (in Fahrenheit). So they also call this little green guy the Thermometer Cricket.

Category : Bugs | Cool Bugs | Blog
27
Sep
Hercules Beetle and Rhinoceros Beetle

Hercules Beetle and Rhinoceros Beetle Side by Side

I have people get these two beetles confused all the time, so I took a picture of them together so everyone could see the difference. In the photo, the Hercules beetle is the one on top. Most of the time people think the Hercules beetle is the Rhinoceros beetle. The Rhinoceros beetle’s horn is a little harder to notice and is not as large as the Hercules beetle. From the side, the Rhinoceros beetle’s horn looks very much like the head and horns of a Rhinoceros. The side view of the Hercules beetle looks a lot like the shape of a bottle or can opener. Both of these beetles only have the horns on the male of the species. Another difference is the Rhino beetle adults do not feed, while the Hercules beetle feeds on the sap of trees.

Category : Bugs | Cool Bugs | Blog
25
Sep
Orb Weaver Spider Web in the High Desert

Orb Weaver Spider Web in the High Desert

Every time I see an Orb Weaver Spider and their orb web I think of Charlotte’s Web. They make a distinct spiral wheel-shaped web, or “orb,” that most people like to see. When spraying around homes I like to move these guys if they are too close to the house. There are many variations of the orb weaver spider and their physical appearances may vary but they all construct that telltale familiar Orb web. These webs can actually span up to eight feet when made by some of the larger spiders of the species.

Here in Arizona, the larger orb webs that I see average probably around two feet. The webs are constructed of a stretchy silk that they lay out in a spiral pattern. The orb weaver spider builds this web to catch flying insects. The spider pictured I believe is called the Spotted Orb Weaver.

Orbweaver Spider

Orbweaver Spider in Its Web


Category : Bugs | Cool Bugs | Blog